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Water

Topic Review on "Title":

Weak interactions in aqueous systems
Water is a good solvent for polar solutes with which it forms hydrogen bonds. Non-polar compounds dissolve poorly in water. They can not form a hydrogen bond with the solvent. Numerous weak non covalent interactions influence the folding of macromolecules. The physical properties of aqueous solutions are strongly influenced by the concentration of solutes. Ex: The tendency for water to move across a semi permeable membrane is the osmotic pressure.

Ionization of water, weak acids and weak bases
Pure water is slightly ionized. pH is defined as the negative logarithm of the molar hydronium ion concentration. An acid that ionizes completely in water is a strong acid. An acid which is partially ionized in water is a weak acid. pk provides the measure of the ease of the dissociation of the proton. The lower the number the stronger is the acid.

Buffering against pH changes in biological systems
Buffers are aqueous systems that tend to resist in changes in pH when small amounts or acids or base are added. It consists of a weak acid and its conjugate base. As an example a mixture of equal concentrations of acetic acid and acetate ion is a buffer system. Every life form is extremely sensitive to slight pH changes. Human blood for example needs to remain within the pH range of 7.38 to 7.42. The relationship between pH and pk is described by Henderson – Hasselbach equation. It is used to calculate the pH of biological fluids. Two especially important biological buffers are the phosphate and bicarbonate systems. The property of a solution that depends on the concentration of a dissolved solute but not on its chemical identity is known as colligative properties. Substances that do not ionize in water are non electrolytes. Vapor pressure, boiling point, freezing point and osmosis are colligative properties.

Water as a reactant
Water is very often a direct participant in the chemical reactions of living cells. Formation of ATP from ADP and inorganic phosphate is an example of a condensation reaction in which the elements of water are eliminated. Two amino acid molecules are covalently joined through a peptide bond with a loss of water molecule.

Fitness of the aqueous environment for living organisms
The high specific heat of water is useful to cells and organisms because it allows water to act as a ‘heat buffer’, keeping the temperature of an organism relatively constant as the temperature of the surroundings fluctuates.


Rapid Study Kit for "Title":
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Core Concept Tutorial Problem Solving Drill Review Cheat Sheet

"Title" Tutorial Summary :
Water is a good solvent for polar solutes with which it forms hydrogen bonds. Non-polar compounds dissolve poorly in water. They can not form a hydrogen bond with the solvent. Numerous weak non covalent interactions influence the folding of macromolecules. The physical properties of aqueous solutions are strongly influenced by the concentration of solutes. The equilibrium constant describes whether an acid or a base is strong or weak. A mixture of weak acid and its salt resists changes in pH caused by the addition of H+ or OH-. The mixture functions as a buffer. The relationship between pH and pk is described by Henderson-Hasselbach equation. It is used to calculate the pH of biological fluids. Water is very often a direct participant in the chemical reactions of living cells.

Tutorial Features:
  • Three concept maps to explain the topics which are dealt with.
  • Diagrammatic representation of water molecule and hydrogen bonding.
  • Diagrams which are easy to understand and recollect.
  • Equations and derivatives for ionization of water, dissociation constant of acid and base and H-H equation.
  • Animations in proton adsorption or desorption and titration curve to shown isoelectric points.
  • Method for calculation of pH.

"Title" Topic List:

Weak interactions in aqueous systems

  • Weak interactions
  • Formation of a water molecule and a hydrogen bond
  • Common hydrogen bonds in biological systems
  • Entropy and free energy change
  • Van der Waals forces
  • Amphipathic compounds

Ionization of water, weak acids and weak bases

  • Autoprotolysis
  • pH, acids, bases
  • Acidic alkaline and neutral solutions
  • Acid and base dissociation constant
  • pk and ionization
  • Titration curve for weak acids

Buffering against pH changes in biological systems

  • Buffers
  • Biological buffers
  • Henderson-Hasselbach equation and its significance
  • Buffering action in blood
  • Colligative properties
  • Osmosis

Water as a reactant

  • Condensation reaction – nucleotide
  • Condensation reaction – peptide

Fitness of the aqueous environment for living organisms



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Teach Yourself Biochemistry Visually in 24 Hours

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